Pharmacy Technician Job – Three Strategies For Getting A Job

As I searched on EzineArticles for pharmacy technician jobs, I found many good articles written on how to become a pharmacy technician, or various reasons why you should become a pharmacy technician. In general, they all make good points and provide useful information. It has made me think about what we are missing. I do not want to simply rehash the same topics and then add a few of my own thoughts. Then it occurred to me, I have a perspective that few people who are writing articles for pharmacy technicians have. I am the person who sits on every interview for pharmacy technicians in my institution’s inpatient pharmacy. Over the course of just one year, I probably interview about 50 to 60 technicians for about 10 to 12 openings. So here it is, what are three things you can do to get a job when you have just obtained your license/certification/registration (depends on your state), still working on your license, or maybe just moved to a new area and want to find a job (this happened to me as a pharmacy tech, and I will share one of my biggest mistakes when looking for a job)?

Volunteer or complete your required hours (depends on your state requirements for licensure/certification) in a pharmacy practice site you would like to work. Many states require you to obtain practice hours before you become a pharmacy technician. If your state does not require hours prior to becoming a pharmacy technician, then pick a set number of hours (40 to 80 hours should do it) and volunteer at a pharmacy. The pharmacy you choose should be a place you would like to work. If you know you want to work in a hospital pharmacy, then do not obtain your hours or volunteer at a community/retail pharmacy. Next, take advantage of this time by showing your practice site how good of a pharmacy technician you are. The traits I look for the most are someone who is a team player, proactive about taking on any work that he/she sees needs completing, and gets a long with other staff. I am looking for is a good fit, not necessarily the smartest tech, but the one who will be a good team member. What this time really amounts to is a trial period where the pharmacy gets to see how you work and you get to see if you really want a job there. I have had a few students who goof off or text for a large portion of their time in my pharmacy. Unfortunately, they will not even make the interview list for the next open position.
Obtain national certification, BLS/CPR, and be active in one of your state’s pharmacy organizations; and make sure you have these items on your resume. Regardless if your state requires you to get nationally certified or not, you should do it. The two major national certifications that are most recognized are the PTCB and the ExCPT. BLS/CPR (basic life support/cardiopulmonary resuscitation – for the most part it is the same thing) is a good additional skill that most pharmacy managers will consider a bonus. It tells them that the applicant is engaged in healthcare and will more likely be engaged as a pharmacy technician. State pharmacy organization (either the state ASHP affiliate or APhA affiliate) participation is another way to show your commitment to the pharmacy profession. In most states, it cost very little to be a member as a technician. Once you are a member, look for the Website link on joining a committee. If you have options, join the committee that sounds like the most fun (I personally like advocacy or legislative). Now be active in your committee, this is a great way to network with pharmacists and other technicians. Pharmacy is a small world, the more connections you make, the better off you will be. Once you have done some or all of this, make sure your update you resume.
Look on company Websites for job openings and not just the local newspaper or online newspaper site. This was my big mistake. After living on the east coast for many years I moved out to the west coast. I began looking for jobs in the local newspaper and there were a few, but not the ones I was most interested in (I was a sterile compounding tech and wanted to work in a hospital or IV infusion setting) were never open. Fortunately for me, a large health-system (the one I currently still work for after 11 years) was hiring a graveyard technician and didn’t get enough applicants from their internal site so they placed a newspaper ad. After I got a job, I found out about the company job postings Website, and I was seriously bummed that I had wasted months not looking in the right place. While you are on the company Website, do some homework about the company so that you can speak about the company during your interview. I will typically ask applicants why they want a job with my company or pharmacy, if you can respond with an answer that shows you have done some homework on the company, that will impress most interviewers (do not over do it or be cheesy, find something you genuinely like about the company).
I hope this article has been helpful to you. If you have any questions or topics for additional articles, please send them to me by submitting a comment on my Website listed in the author box.

Pharmacist Career – Is It For You?

Choosing the career you would like to pursue is clearly much more important than choosing what clothes to wear for that big party or what cake you want for dessert. It’s definitely much harder and complicated and it’s one that will directly affect your life to next five, ten or even twenty years so it must be done with care and wisdom.

The healthcare industry has continued to grow over the past decade and it will continue to do so with as the American population continues to age and therefore an in demand career will definitely be that of a pharmacist or pharmacy technician.

Becoming a pharmacist is a noble profession but it certainly doesn’t have the prestige of a brain surgeon or other medical professional titles but it’s a solid career and one that more and more are turning to help ensure a good living and job security.

Although pharmacists makes a decent living most pharmacists don’t make what would be considered a high salary unless that attain a position in a top-level research project undertaken to make innovations in the drug industry but the responsibility and importance of a pharmacist must be underestimated and undervalued.

To become a pharmacist, you must first earn a pharmacist degree from a college or university which is recognized by the Educational Board in your state and accredited by the American Council on Pharmacy Education or ACPE. Upon graduation, you must then pass certain examinations in order to receive a license to practice in your chosen field.

The major pharmacist examinations are the North America Pharmacist License Examination or NAPLEX and the Multistate Pharmacist Jurisprudence Examination or MPJE – both are administered by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. You may also be required to pass additional examinations, depending on the rules in your state so it’s better to check with the state authorities regarding their particular requirements. In addition, if you plan on moving to another state, you may also be required to pass that states’ pharmacist examinations.

A pharmacist is usually given the job of managing a pharmacy or drugstore. They are assigned to provide drugs to patients that have been prescribed by doctors and other healthcare practitioners. A pharmacist is also required to supply information to patients regarding other drugs, like the best brands when it comes to over the counter drugs. The pharmacist is also responsible for supervising others workers in the pharmacy like pharmacy technicians and pharmacist aides. In many instances, a pharmacist must double check the work of his subordinates in order to make sure that no error has been committed.

In hospitals, nursing homes, clinics and other healthcare facilities, the responsibilities and degree of authority given to pharmacists goes a notch higher. A pharmacist advises doctors on the selection of medicine, the side effects of each particular drug and the optimal dosages.

Pharmacists are expected to have an extensive knowledge on the composition of drugs, their uses and potential patient side affects. With all the questions a pharmacist receives regarding medicines they distribute they must be very knowledgeable and attentive to what advice they offer because of the potential consequences of offering poor advice.

The role of a pharmacist takes on a more social context in small town pharmacies. The pharmacist can sometimes be tagged as some sort of guardian towards the younger generation, advising on issues such as pre-marital sex, birth control pills and the proper use of sleeping pills or tranquilizers. Pharmacists may also play the role as counselor towards those who request information and maybe be asked to make personal healthcare suggestions.

Another career path that some pharmacists take is that of Research and Development with the drug companies. The reason behind this is normally financially based because they have the opportunity to earn a much higher salary. However, in order to secure these types or job one must have exceptional skills and total commitment.

On the other hand, some pharmacists prefer to work for insurance agencies and work as a consultant for health concerns. Other pharmacists however prefer what they say is the most noble of all professions and teach classes in high school and college.

If the allure of a pharmacist or pharmacy technician career appeals to you, check out the links below.

Pharmacy Technician Job Description, What It Takes to Become a Pharmacy Technician?

Do you think you have what it takes to become a successful pharmacy technician? Take a look at this in-depth analysis of the typical pharmacy technician job description. If you want to be successful in this career choice, you want to be certain that many of your attributes line up with the mental and physical characteristics needed to perform well seen in the everyday life of many pharmacy technicians.

Let me start out by saying that regardless of what area you pursue (institutional or retail) for the most part, you will be involved in a fast paced environment. Certain times of the day can be stressful for many pharmacy technicians. For example, if you are working in retail you will most likely deal with short-tempered customers that are eager to drop off their prescriptions and be on their way in five minutes or less. There will be insurance issues that you will have to deal with on a regular basis. With the emergence of the internet, you have the added feature for online refills. This adds to the already heavy workload due to drop off prescriptions and phone in prescription refills.

If you are focusing mainly on an institutional setting, your focus will be on hospitalized patients and patients having procedures done in the clinics. This setting has a whole different stress level of its own. For example let’s say a patient is due for some type of surgery, the surgeon realizes that he needs a different IV bag, he calls down to the pharmacy and orders and IV stat. Being the IV room technician, it is your job and responsibility to prepare the IV admixture in record time. More cases than not, this can be a life or death situation. Imagine having the pressure mount on you knowing that you have to prepare this in a timely fashion, but you also have to prepare it with accuracy.

Here’s a general breakdown of the typical pharmacy technician job description for most pharmacy technicians. The main goal for a pharmacy technician is to assist the pharmacist in his duties and to provide the best customer service to patients. A pharmacy technician will receive prescriptions via telephone, fax, internet, and walk-ins. They generally are responsible for answering phone calls, but are limited by law to the advice that they may give out. Technicians will generally fill medication carts for the patients that are hospitalized. These medication carts are filled with one, two, or three days worth of meds. They are delivered to the patient floors and meds are dispensed accordingly.

Other duties include stocking medication on the shelves, ordering supplies, pre-packing medications, assisting customers in outpatient pharmacies, counting tablets, and doing some form of compounding of creams and ointments. Due to the structure of the pharmacy, some technicians will prepare IV admixtures. IV admixtures take a bit more training due to the implications that occur from technician error. Intravenous medications are given through the vein, which means the drug has instant contact with the blood stream. Knowing this, technicians have to be certain that the amount of drug is correct; also they have to be certain that they are using the most sterile technique as possible. Some technicians are eventually trained in chemotherapy agents that are given intravenously. Technicians without the proper training should never attempt to prepare these types of IV admixtures.

Technicians should have a great working knowledge of basic math skills, should have wonderful communication skills (verbal and written). The technician should be familiar with both weighing and measuring of medications. Due to the need for order entry, it is heavily advised that pharmacy technicians have some sort of computer skills. Some pharmacies look for technicians that are self motivated and action takers. The job can require long hours of standing with little to no breaks throughout the day.

The pharmacy technician job description may seem very draining at first, but it does have its upside as well. For starters there will be a huge demand for these career professionals. With the shortage of pharmacists, pharmacy technicians will be in great need to handle the technical side of things. These are areas that the pharmacist will have little to no time to oversee these areas. As far as financial rewards, many pharmacy technicians are paid handsomely for their efforts. One thing to keep in mind is that most institutional pharmacy technicians generally make more than retail pharmacy technicians. If you are after the financial gains, then Hospital Pharmacy is where you will find the financial benefits. Another added benefit is that you can advance your career in many ways as a technician. You can become certified. You can continue schooling and become an actual pharmacist. Some technicians enter this field and go on to become nurses. Entering this field can be a springboard for other healthcare occupations.

Now that you have seen a general Pharmacy technician job description overview, ask yourself do you have what it takes? Assess your skills. Focus on your strengths and weaknesses. Analyze the pros and cons of both the retail and the hospital setting. See which area will be of greater interest to you and a perfect match for your abilities. After you have made a complete and thorough analysis, get the training and get started in your new career that will reward you for years to come.

The Roles Of A Pharmacy Technician In A Day Of His Life

The demand of services of Pharmacy Technician New Jersey is increasing across the US and all parts of the globe. But how pharmacist and pharmacy technicians are different from one another? What are the roles of pharmacy technician in the workplace?

Patients, pharmacists and visitors directly rely on the work of pharmacy technicians in the pharmacies. A significant stock of medications is stored in pharmacies and a small mix-up could be hazardous or even life-threatening. So, the medicines should be hygiene, well organized and arranged by responsible staff.

Speaking to Patients
Most people don’t know about it but customer service is one of the most basic roles of pharmacy tech. You should also be prepared to pick the calls up and answer the queries of patients. If possible, you also have to fix the appointments for them with doctors. When they visit you for medications, you will also have to supply medicines to the departments and patients. Sometimes, a smiling face supplements the effect of medications � you will perform well if you help them frankly.

Pharmacy Technician � Around the Pharmacy and About
You will be appointed with all types of responsibilities around the pharmacy. Sometimes, your key responsibilities can be administrative. It means you have to record the filled prescriptions, maintain the account of stock and supply and fill the prescription orders of pharmacists.

Sometimes, you will also have to keep all the medications in the pharmacy clean, safe and well-organized. You might be assigned with the duty of filling prescription bottles after counting pills, and ensuring the proper places of medications at the appropriate temperatures, or affixing prices on prescription drugs. It means, you should have knowledge about the medications, at least a bit. Only by looking at the pills, you should be capable to tell the difference among medicines. And by looking the name, you should be capable to identify the effects of medicines.

Since all pharmacies have their own standards of infection-control, safety and health, you will be assigned for this maintenance. You will also have to organize the medicines because even a small mixture could be dangerous for the health of patient and it can cost you more.

Summary
You should abide by all the assigned duties and responsibilities in the pharmacy, as a pharmacy technician. With a group of other technicians, you will have to work every day. For others, medicines are puzzling. But being a pharmacy technician, you will be aware of the effects of all the medicines.

Sometimes, you will also have to keep all the medications in the pharmacy clean, safe and well-organized. You might be assigned with the duty of filling prescription bottles after counting pills, and ensuring the proper places of medications at the appropriate temperatures, or affixing prices on prescription drugs. It means, you should have knowledge about the medications, at least a bit. Only by looking at the pills, you should be capable to tell the difference among medicines. And by looking the name, you should be capable to identify the effects of medicines.